Thanks to all my wonderful pop-up shop customers in December 2012!

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Here are a few photos from this year’s offering.

Sapa, an ideal destination for textile lovers.

I recently spent a week in and around the town of Sapa, in the far northwestern part of Vietnam.

Besides the spectacular scenery of mountains and ricefield valleys, the area has much to offer anyone who is interested in textiles, because it is home to around 8 different ethnic groups that still make and wear their traditional clothing. I had visited Sapa 17 years ago and was curious to see what it would be like now, and how much of the textile traditions were still being practiced. I had been there once before 17 years ago and it was interesting to see the changes that have taken place since then. Tourism has developed substantially during that time and it was clear to see that it benefitted the H’mong in many ways. However it is also clear to see that they are still very poor and their life is not easy. It was sad to see that even though they still cling to their traditional ways, consumerism has taken a toll on the way the H’mong people make their traditional clothing. I had hoped to find indigo batik-making on hemp, but unfortunately cheap cotton imported from China, printed in blue ink with the H’mong patterns has all but replaced the beautiful hand-made wax resist designs on indigo-dyed, hand woven hemp used for the bottoms of skirts. The purses these Black H’mong women are carrying are mass-produced by machine in China. They used to embellish these by hand with meticulous and beautiful embroidery.

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Yogyakarta, my new second home.

Yogyakarta has always been one of my favorite cities in Indonesia. Every trip to Indonesia I’ve made over the past 20 years it seems a must do city. It’s a cultural center, educational center, and one of Indonesia’s culinary capitals. Besides all of these features it’s a wonderful place to live, full of youthful energy, and the creative input of many artists. It’s proximity to Borobudur, Prambanan, and many other ancient temples makes it an ideal place for tourists and cultural research.

I recently decided to make it my base for the continued research of Javanese culture, especially with regard to Indonesia’s cultural treasure, batik. Yogyakarta has an active keraton (sultan’s palace) and batik-making continues to be a major point of interest here.

My life is much different here from what I am used to in San Francisco. Each day is a new experience and often a new challenge in acknowledging and accepting cultural differences. My attitude has become one of openness as a result. I learn everyday that I have so much more to learn. Here are a few photos from my neighborhood.

 

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Ms. Nujuang, weaver of silk matmee, Issan

Issan has long been acclaimed for its textile weaving traditions. Recently I had the opportunity to visit a weaving village, Ban Ton, on the edge of the town of Ban Khwaow in northeastern Thailand, know as Issan. I met Ms. Nujuang who kindly shared a wealth of information translated by my friend and guide, Mr. Ping. She shows some of her work in this photo, a typical silk matmee for local use as a skirt, wrapped much like a sarong, for important village functions.

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